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Year ... and there!

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by cambrensis, Jun 11, 2013.

  1. cambrensis

    cambrensis Member

    trueCall Model:
    trueCall Call Blocker + Recorder
    Country:
    Welshman in England!
    This brief (you hope!) piece is to enlarge on what I started, over-enthusiastically perhaps, elsewhere. TC mentioned the Anglo-Welsh habit of saying things such as "by year", etc and I enlarged on it. The dialect of English involved is referred to jocularly by many of us, especially if bilingual, as "Winglish". I don't need to explain this portmanteau word I am sure.

    There are many of these phrases , relating to locations, all English words but used in a very un-English way: by year; by there; over by year; over by there; down by year; down by there -- and so on! :) All these are direct translations into English of standard Welsh phrases. The same phrases are translated slightly differently in another part of the UK where the old language disappeared over two centuries ago. I was fascinated as a youngster asking directions and being told: "You go up along left, then down along right..." I was in Devon of course.

    The strangest one to the English ear is probably! "Don't call Wil on your father!" = Dont call your father by his Christian name! (i.e. "Don't teach your grandmother to suck eggs!") I've always loved that one.

    By now you'll have gathered that language and dialect fascinate me, especially the way in which we endeavour to understand each other despite some of the deep differences. I can remember as a student, acting as interpreter between some Somerset lads and others from Newcastle! You may well imagine! The greatest hilarity and consternation was occasioned by the Somerset lads' use of the word "flasher" - it meant a lighthouse!

    I left Wales over half a century ago and spent 35 years teaching English in Essex and Suffolk. The early years were wonderful; I'd learned enough Saxon at university to understand the locals perfectly from day one! "That wor a-rainin'!" "That snew larst neet 'bor!" I'd not known that any Saxon had survived - sadly it's mostly gone now having been replaced by "Estuary English".

    I still have not explained "coppish" - and I shan't. It's an English word, pronounced more or less as Shakespeare would have pronounced it. It appears in all of his plays, and the word is sometimes used as well! (That's another clue...or should I write "clew"?) I'm sure somebody knows it or can guess...a guess would be nice. It is not spelled that way in dictionaries, however.

    In the early years of cold calling I delighted in linguistic ploys upon the unsuspecting caller, anything to cause confusion. However, their methods have become more sophisticated and they are frequently more belligerent, so the fun has gone out of that. Thank heavens for trueCall!

    I'm hoping that some may be inspired to add dialect words and phrases that they have culled over the years. I'm a bit of a polyglot as are at least two other members here...I suspect there are more. So...I live in hope! :wallbash:
     
  2. Top Cat

    Top Cat Administrator Staff Member

    trueCall Model:
    trueCall Classic + Extra + Recorder
    Country:
    Englishman in Wales!
    doubt. (Or should that be "dowt"?)
     
  3. cambrensis

    cambrensis Member

    trueCall Model:
    trueCall Call Blocker + Recorder
    Country:
    Welshman in England!
    Krekt! But gerraway, mun! There must be some - but where's they to? :rofl:
     

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